Your Own UX Teardown

Now you'll get a chance to flex your UX muscles by tearing down a site

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teardown hammer through wall

You've read a whole lot about UX and you've seen it applied to a real site. It's about time you tried it out for yourself.

In this assignment, you will perform a UX teardown of three existing sites. A "teardown" really just means you'll be taking apart the site conceptually and answering a few questions about it.

Coincidentally, these questions align exactly with how you'll approach creating your own sites with good user experiences. For each site listed below, answer the following questions:

  1. Who is the key user? This isn't always clear, especially in marketplace sites, so take your best guess.
  2. What is that user's number one critical goal when using the site? Be as specific as possible if there are multiple options here, e.g. "to purchase a red wagon" instead of "buy a toy".
  3. What is likely to make that user's experience particularly positive (i.e. provide good satisfaction)?
  4. What is the approximate information architecture of the site? (sketch it out)
  5. What is the flow through that architecture for the user who is accomplishing the critical goal you identified above?
  6. What style(s) of navigation is/are used? Do they answer the key questions (Where am I and how did I get here? Where should I go next and how do I get there?)?
  7. What key interactions does the user have? Are they clear and usable?
  8. What did the site do well to allow the user to accomplish his goal effectively, efficiently and with good satisfaction?
  9. What did the site do poorly when allowing the user to accomplish his goal effectively, efficiently and with good satisfaction?

We'll stick with sites that tend to have clear goals instead of those which are trying to accomplish too much (e.g. Yahoo.com).

Site 1: Twitter.com

Twitter's Homepage

Site 2: AirBnB.com

AirBnB's Homepage

Site 3: Amazon.com

Amazon's Homepage

Submission

You don't need to submit these but they do make good blog posts. If you've completed them, feel free to send the links to hello@vikingcodeschool.com and we'll post them here.



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